10 Buzzworthy Canadian Authors to Watch

Headshots of buzzworthy Canadian Authors

In honour of Canada Day on the first of July, we’re paying tribute to our national roots by highlighting a number of authors who are making waves in Canadian literature. These writers come from across the country and from all walks of life, have different beliefs and backgrounds, and offer us unique perspectives of the world. Their work demonstrates the vast talent and diverse experiences taking place between our coasts. Here are ten noteworthy authors the watch. 


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Indigenous Authors Contemplate a “New Normal”

This June marks the 11th anniversary of National Indigenous History Month in Canada, where we are fortunate to find the work of many Indigenous authors who have enlightened our hearts and minds through writing. This ia time for recognition and reflection on the unique heritage, culture and contributions of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. As it happens, this is also a time for monumental change, as the world continues to adapt to the effects of a global health crisisTo spotlight the Indigenous experience during this pivotal timewe asked three Indigenous writers, who have released a book within the past 12 months, how their writing has been impacted by COVID-19. Below, you’ll find their deeply personal responses and discover their hopes of a new normal, post pandemic.

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Why Writing is Not Such a Solitary Experience

Review editor at the Quill & Quire, Steven W. Beattie, was one of the 2018 Festival Delegates and in this guest post, he writes about the solitary experience of being a writer and how opportunities like the Delegates Programme offers writers a chance to engage with the community. Look out for links to guest posts written by Beattie’s fellow delegates!

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Extra Credit with the ‘Between Words and Worlds’ Panel

between-the-words-and-worlds

Last week, the Between Words and Worlds: New Canadian Women’s Writing panel had a great conversation at the Harbourfront Centre as part of the IFOA Weekly. We wanted to continue the discussion here by allowing the authors to share their thoughts on “in-betweenness” starting by revisiting the moderator, Soraya Peerbaye’s, answer to the question: “What does in-betweenness mean to you as someone juggling identities, and whether or not you feel yourself engaged in a diasporic conversation?”

Soraya Peerbaye

I don’t believe that my experience of in-betweenness is about juggling identities, about strategies or positions of identity. For me it’s relational; relations not only between places, cultures, and experiences, but also between what is known and unknown; relations with time, who we were, how we are catalyzed, how we awaken to new senses of ourselves.

If anything, I think the critique of CanLit,that is now at the fore, emerges from a sense that white/settler literature is sometimes isolated; asleep to the way its material is animated by tensions of history, of contemporary movements; asleep to the overtones in the voices of its characters. Yes, I feel myself engaged in a diasporic conversation, deeply – but that is a conversation I’ve sought to be a part of, and to be changed by. It isn’t inherent to identity.

You can read more over at Between Words and Worlds with Soraya Peerbaye.

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