Why Writing is Not Such a Solitary Experience

Review editor at the Quill & Quire, Steven W. Beattie, was one of the 2018 Festival Delegates and in this guest post, he writes about the solitary experience of being a writer and how opportunities like the Delegates Programme offers writers a chance to engage with the community. Look out for links to guest posts written by Beattie’s fellow delegates!

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Extra Credit with the ‘Between Words and Worlds’ Panel

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Last week, the Between Words and Worlds: New Canadian Women’s Writing panel had a great conversation at the Harbourfront Centre as part of the IFOA Weekly. We wanted to continue the discussion here by allowing the authors to share their thoughts on “in-betweenness” starting by revisiting the moderator, Soraya Peerbaye’s, answer to the question: “What does in-betweenness mean to you as someone juggling identities, and whether or not you feel yourself engaged in a diasporic conversation?”

Soraya Peerbaye

I don’t believe that my experience of in-betweenness is about juggling identities, about strategies or positions of identity. For me it’s relational; relations not only between places, cultures, and experiences, but also between what is known and unknown; relations with time, who we were, how we are catalyzed, how we awaken to new senses of ourselves.

If anything, I think the critique of CanLit,that is now at the fore, emerges from a sense that white/settler literature is sometimes isolated; asleep to the way its material is animated by tensions of history, of contemporary movements; asleep to the overtones in the voices of its characters. Yes, I feel myself engaged in a diasporic conversation, deeply – but that is a conversation I’ve sought to be a part of, and to be changed by. It isn’t inherent to identity.

You can read more over at Between Words and Worlds with Soraya Peerbaye.

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A Remedy for Valentine’s Day Writer’s Block: Borrow Some Prose from the Pros

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Valentine’s Day is approaching so the Toronto International Festival of Authors wants to help you with your writer’s block. For those special people in your life for whom a convenience store card just won’t suffice, look no further than to these poetic lines below. From poets both modern and classic, here is some prose to quote in your love letters, or to inspire verses of your own.


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10 Authors to Read This Black History Month (and Beyond)

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The Toronto International Festival of Authors (TIFA) is proud to take part in Harbourfront Centre’s Kuumba 2019: the longest-running Black History Month celebration in Toronto. On Wednesday, February 20 we’ll be celebrating The Launch of Black Writers Matter, an anthology of African Canadian creative nonfiction. The conversation will include editor Whitney French and contributors Simone Dalton, Scott FraserPhillip Dwight Morgan and Angela Wright. The event will be hosted by Nadia L. Hohn.

TIFA has had the pleasure of featuring numerous voices that honour the heritage, traditions and culture of Black communities here in Canada and across the globe. In honour of Black History Month, we’ve selected ten Black authors from the TIFA archives whose work we invite you to read this February, and all year round.

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