Saturday, October 26, 2019 - 6:00 PM
Book Signing, Panel Discussion, Q & A, Reading: 40th Festival Edition | Festivals

Lakeside Terrace, Harbourfront Centre

235 Queens Quay West
Toronto M5J 2G8
Cost: $18

Desire and violence intersect for youth in turmoil, in the latest novels by these three hard-hitting authors. Canadian Mona Awad’s Bunny, accounts the unforgettable story of a recluse graduate student whose world spirals into the macabre upon befriending a clique of rich girls on campus. Estonian Rein Raud’s brilliantly translated spy novel, The Death of a Perfect Sentence, follows a group of young pro-independence dissidents during the dying days of the Soviet Union, while Hungarian Benedek Totth’s debut, Dead Heat, has been dubbed an instant cult classic with comparisons to Trainspotting, for its story about young men coming of age in an abandoned generation. Hear these characters come to life and learn about the real-life inspirations behind these unforgettable tales of relationships and longing. The conversation will be moderated by Grace O’Connell. Hosted by Natasha Ramoutar.

         

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Participants

  • Mona Awad

    Mona Awad is the author of 13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl, a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize and recipient of the Amazon Canada First Novel Award, the Colorado Book Award and an Honorable Mention from the Arab American Book Awards. It was also longlisted for the International Dublin Literary Award and the Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal for Humour. The recipient of an MFA in Fiction from Brown University and a PhD in English and Creative Writing from the University of Denver, she has published work in TimeVICEElectric LiteratureMcSweeney'sLos Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere.

  • Grace O'Connell. Photo Credit: Dani Coutoure

    Grace O'Connell

    Grace O’Connell is the author of the novels Be Ready for the Lightning and Magnified World, a national bestseller. She is a past winner of the Canadian Authors Association Emerging Writer Award, holds an MFA in creative writing from the University of Guelph and her fiction has appeared in various publications including The Globe and Mail, The Journey Prize Stories and The Walrus. She teaches creative writing at the University of Toronto and works as a freelance writer and editor.  

  • Natasha Ramoutar

    Natasha Ramoutar is an Indo-Guyanese writer by way of Scarborough (Ganatsekwyagon) at the east side of Toronto. Her work has been included in projects by Diaspora Dialogues, Scarborough Arts, and Nuit Blanche Toronto and has been published in The Unpublished City II, PRISM Magazine, Room Magazine, THIS Magazine and more. She is the Fiction Editor of FEEL WAYS, an anthology of Scarborough writing, and the Social Media Assistant at the Festival of Literary Diversity. Her first book of poetry Bittersweet will be published in 2020 by Mawenzi House.

  • Rein Raud

    Rein Raud (born 1961 in Tallinn, Estonia) is a writer and a scholar of cultural theory and Japanese classics. He is the author of nine novels, five poetry collections, four other books of fiction, and poetry translations from Japanese, Italian, Lithuanian, Classical Chinese and German, as well as numerous academic publications. He has received the Estonian Best Book of Fiction Award (2004 and 2013) and the Eduard Vilde Award (2009). Three of his novels have been published in English: The Brother (2016), The Reconstruction (2017) and The Death of the Perfect Sentence (2017), longlisted for the Dublin International Literary Award. Supported by Estonian Studies Centre/VEMU and the Cultural Endowment of Estonia.

  • Benedek Totth

    Born in Hungary in 1977, Benedek Totth studied American literature and now works as an editor and translator in Budapest. His translations into Hungarian include works by Stephen King, Cormac McCarthy, Hunter S. Thompson and William S. Burroughs. Dead Heat, his first novel, caused a sensation in Hungary, where it won the Margó Prize for best first novel of the year. It has been published in translation in France and Slovakia. Supported by the Consulate General of Hungary in Toronto.