Between Words and Worlds with Soraya Peerbaye

Woman sits upon a mountain and gazes at the landscape

Next week, the Toronto International Festival of Authors will present Between Words and Worlds: New Canadian Women’s Writing. To give readers a preview of what the event hopes to explore with regards to the stories we tell, we reached out to the event’s moderator, Soraya Peerbaye.

The panel discussion will feature Inanna Publications authors Ami Sands Brodoff, Connie Guzzo-McParland, Mariam Pirbhai and Mehri Yalfani, and is billed as a unique opportunity to explore foreground characters and experiences that are still rarely attended to in mainstream publishing in Canada. We asked Peerbaye what specific themes she hopes to cover on stage:

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3 Ways to Celebrate National Poetry Month

Don't Be Nice. Director: Max Powers. 2017. Movie.

Screenshot from Don’t Be Nice, a film by Max Powers

In 1999, UNESCO adopted March 21 as World Poetry Day to “honour poets, revive oral traditions of poetry recitals, promote the reading, writing and teaching of poetry, foster the convergence between poetry and other arts such as theatre, dance, music and painting, and raise the visibility of poetry in the media” around the world. Today marks its 19th year.

In Canada, we’re fortunate to also be celebrating the 20th anniversary of National Poetry Month. This profoundly takes place during a time when social media dialogue and the issues of today are reviving an interest in poetry with a new generation. Poetry’s popularity is evidenced by the rise of Rupi Kaur’s milk and honey and The Sun and Her Flowers, among other poets, on Canadian and international bestseller lists. Also, responding to the demand for poetry, the League of Canadian Poets has released longlists for its Gerald Lampert Memorial Award, Pat Lowther Memorial Award, and Raymond Souster Award, for the first time ever.

We’ve established our top three ways to celebrate National Poetry Month, and invite you to join us.

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Writing Women’s History: An Interview with The Red Word’s Sarah Henstra

Women's March

Online movements like #MeToo have forced an important conversation on power, consent, sexual harassment and assault into the spotlight which has led to real world actions like the Times Up Legal Defense Fund.

As it’s the first day of Women’s History Month, we wanted to take the time to chat with author Sarah Henstra ahead of her Toronto Lit Up book launch on March 8th.

Henstra’s arresting novel, The Red Word, is set on an American campus where a Canadian sophomore, Karen Huls, deals with the conflict of dating a member of the Gamma Beta Chi fraternity while living with the radical feminists of the Raghurst house. We asked Henstra why she chose to write about rape culture, and campus culture, in her book:

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5 Questions with Mayank Bhatt

Mayank Bhatt 5 Questions banner

Mayank Bhatt discusses how his novel, Belief, is very relevant today on the topic of immigration and settlement in Canada in our Five Questions series. He also talks about the standout moments in publishing his  debut novel and what he’s reading.

Bhatt will be participating in IFOA Weekly’s ‘What’s Life Got To Do With It?’ panel discussion on Wednesday, March 7th at 7:30 pm.


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A Remedy for Valentine’s Day Writer’s Block: Borrow Some Prose from the Pros

photo-by-john-jennings-on-unsplash

Valentine’s Day is approaching so the Toronto International Festival of Authors wants to help you with your writer’s block. For those special people in your life for whom a convenience store card just won’t suffice, look no further than to these poetic lines below. From poets both modern and classic, here is some prose to quote in your love letters, or to inspire verses of your own.


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