Tuesday, October 24, 2017 - 6:00 PM
: Festivals

Lakeside Terrace, Harbourfront Centre

235 Queens Quay West
Toronto M5J 2G8
Cost: $18/$15 for IFOA Supporters, Free for students and youth

What makes or breaks a short story? Bill Gaston, Diane Schoemperlen and Drew Hayden Taylor share their thoughts with literary journalist Steven Beattie on why they write in this challenging form. Hosted by Nicole Chin.


This event has a Door Prize. You have a chance to win a library valued up to $500, courtesy of Douglas & McIntyre.

dougmac

 

 

 


Participants

  • Steven W. Beattie

    Toronto writer and critic Steven W. Beattie is the review editor for Quill & Quire. His writing has appeared in the National PostThe Globe and MailThe WalrusCanadian Notes & Queries and elsewhere. He maintains the literary website That Shakespearean Rag.

  • Nicole Chin. Author. The Unpublished City. Shooting the Bitch. BookThug. IFOA. House of Anansi.

    Nicole Chin

    Nicole Chin is the author of the House of Anansi Press Digital Short, “Shooting the Bitch”, which received the McIllquham Foundation Prize for best original short story. Her work has appeared in Joyland Magazine, Room Magazine, The Puritan, Found Press and others. She has been long-listed for the House of Anansi Broken Social Scene Short Story Contest and was the recipient of the Helen Richards Campbell Memorial Award.

  • Bill Gaston

    Bill Gaston is the author of seven novels and seven collections of short fiction, as well as a book of poems and a memoir, Midnight Hockey. His fiction has been shortlisted for the Giller Prize, and twice for the Governor General's Award. His most recent novel, The World, won the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize. He lives in Victoria, B.C.

  • Diane Schoemperlen

    Diane Schoemperlen has published several critically acclaimed collections of short fiction and three novels. Her collection Forms of Devotion: Stories and Pictures won the 1998 Governor-General’s Award for English Fiction, and her 2014 collection, By the Book: Stories and Pictures was compared to the works of Lydia Davis, David Markson and Padgett Powell by The New York Times Sunday Book Review. Her book, This Is Not My Life: A Memoir of Love, Prison, and Other Complications was shortlisted for the 2017 RBC Taylor Prize. She is currently on the faculty of the Humber School of Writing Correspondence Program. She lives in Kingston, Ontario. She presents First Things First: Early and Uncollected Fictions.

  • Drew Hayden Taylor

    Drew Hayden Taylor has done many things, most of which he is proud. An Ojibway from the Curve Lake First Nations in Ontario, he has worn many hats in his literary career, from performing stand-up comedy at the Kennedy Center in Washington, to being Artistic Director of Canada’s premiere Native theatre company, Native Earth Performing Arts.  He has been an award-winning playwright, a journalist/columnist, short-story writer, novelist, television scriptwriter and has worked on over 17 documentaries exploring the Native experience. Most notably, he wrote and directed the documentary Redskins, Tricksters and Puppy Stew for the National Film Board of Canada.